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ARE YOU READY FOR THE STORM?

 

 

 

By Paul Proctor

March 5, 2008

NewsWithViews.com

Some meteorologists are saying Tennessee has become part the new tornado alley once associated with the Midwest. Having grown up in Texas, I am well acquainted with tornado warnings and all that comes with them, though I have never actually witnessed one on the ground myself, which is pretty amazing, all things considered.

But never in my life have I experienced the kind of storms I have encountered here in Tennessee over the last decade. In fact, I made it a point to have a reinforced shelter to retreat to ever since that F3 went through downtown Nashville here in the late 90s. Those who have huddled in one know how invaluable they are when the radar turns red.

I've always had a fascination with and respect for tornadoes. Storms that spawn them can be very unnerving, especially when you're abruptly awakened by one in the middle of the night - which seems to happen a lot these days. What many don't know is how quickly destruction can come. As those caught up in the recent tornadoes of February 5th here in Middle Tennessee can tell you, seconds matter when it comes to finding a place to hide.

Standing amid the rubble of a friend's house that had been blown away by one such twister, she told me it was all over in ten seconds. Fortunately, her family had a secure room to run to before their house exploded around them.

A few years ago, while talking on the telephone one February morning up in the loft of my little A-frame log house, some straight-line winds hit before I could hang up and run to my storm shelter downstairs. In fact, it was all over before I could even reach the steps.

To my utter amazement, a hundred-year old, hundred-foot tall elm tree came crashing down just enough to the right of my humble home to avoid crushing it with me inside. Instead, it flattened a car, which happened to be parked nearby.

You see, I knew the storm was on the way but had been momentarily distracted by some personal business I thought needed tending to. Time got away from me. Consequently, when it finally arrived, I wasn't ready; and it almost cost me dearly.

I won't make that mistake again.

How easy it is to get distracted by the mundane matters of everyday life. We invariably put off making preparations for disaster that could save us when the storms of life come, thinking, we'll cross that bridge when we get there - not realizing that when we get there, the bridge may be out.

Eternity has its perils as well. And, if we wait until tragedy comes to address our spiritual needs, an ill wind might well carry us away without the shelter of a Savior. Jesus said: "For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved."

What better shelter could there possibly be?

"Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved." - Acts 4:12

� 2008 Paul Proctor - All Rights Reserved

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Paul Proctor, a rural resident of the Volunteer state and seasoned veteran of the country music industry, retired from showbiz in the late 1990's to dedicate himself to addressing important social issues from a distinctly biblical perspective. As a freelance writer and regular columnist for NewsWithViews.com, he extols the wisdom and truths of scripture through commentary and insight on cultural trends and current events. His articles appear regularly on a variety of news and opinion sites across the internet and in print.

E-Mail: [email protected]

 


 

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You see, I knew the storm was on the way but had been momentarily distracted by some personal business I thought needed tending to. Time got away from me. Consequently, when it finally arrived, I wasn't ready; and it almost cost me dearly.